Waterfront Wednesday July 27!

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The WFPK Waterfront Wednesday® Concert Series is a monthly free concert on the Big Four Lawn in Louisville Waterfront Park, located next to the Big Four Pedestrian and Bicycle Bridge. The Big Four Lawn “opens” at 5pm, and the music begins promptly at 6pm. Have questions? Check out our FAQ page!

To alleviate parking congestion caused by the KY/IN Bridges project, a free trolley service, courtesy of Republic Bank, will be offered between Witherspoon and the Big Four Lawn for people who park West of I-65. The Republic Bank Easy Trolley will run a continuous loop between 6:00 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. We strongly suggest parking West of I -65 in the Witherspoon, Humana and surface lots. Increased bicycle parking will be offered in the event area, courtesy of Parkside Bikes. VIEW MAP OF PARKING OPTIONS HERE.

Contest: Amos Lee Tickets

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Bridge 19’s Video Premier of “The Lion”

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Louisville band Bridge 19 gave us the brand new video of their popular song “The Lion” to debut for our listeners! The song appears on their latest album Riding On A Wire.

Spot: The Paws Report, July 26

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Today on The Paws Report at 3:30:

Despite his smiles, this senior Dalmatian has a sad story to tell. You see, for 14 years Spot was a beloved family member. He had an owner who loved him deeply and a grandson to play with. He was a faithful, affectionate dog who never left his owner’s side. He grew old with his owner, and he loved nothing more than to follow her from room to room and to go on walks with her. Tragically, Spot’s world turned upside down in February. His owner lost her battle with cancer, and he was left alone. The person whom he loved more than anything else in the world and with whom he expected to spend his last days was suddenly gone. He went from room to room, looking for her. He didn’t understand where she went. Slowly, he realized that she was not coming back. His owner’s tragic death set in motion a chain of events that led to Spot being abandoned on a family friend’s patio. For months, this faithful friend took care of Spot. But this friend had two energetic dogs of her own, and Spot, being older and wanting just a quiet place to snooze, did not like sharing a home with two playful, younger dogs. So Spot came to the Kentucky Humane Society. This affectionate dog is now looking for a family who will see past his age and accept him for who he is: a faithful, loving dog who still has lots of love and smiles to give. Could you be the person he’s looking for? Spot is neutered, micro-chipped and up-to-date on vaccinations. All he needs is a soft bed, a loving hand, and a place to spend the rest of his days.

Learn more about Spot including where you can meet him by visiting www.kyhumane.org to view all adoptable animals or call 502-366-3355 for more information.

Muscle Shoals Horns Founder on 91.9

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Ronnie Eades played Baritone Saxophone for the legendary Muscle Shoals Horns from 1967 to 1981. In that span of time, he appeared on over 400 recordings! He recorded with all of the greats who made albums at Fame Studio in Muscle Shoals, Alabama from Lynyrd Skynyrd to James Brown to Aretha Franklin and Etta James. He toured with Elton John and was there when John Lennon showed up at Madison Square Garden! He was a personal friend to Duane Allman of The Allman Brothers. He has many stories to tell, and fortunately for us, he’s a great story teller! Our Saturday Night Blues Party host, Kevin Yazell, struck up a friendship with Ronnie and was my co-host for the hour we got to spend with him.

CitySong with 1200

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Jecorey Arthur is 1200 and picked the University of Louisville’s Comstock Concert Hall for his CitySong video. Here’s what he says about it:

“I probably spent 10,000 hours in this place…working, rehearsing, performing countless concerts. It’s crazy to come back to this place and feel all of those moments rush back to me. It’s also crazy to think about how much time we spent rehearsing and practicing a craft from such a long time ago. All of these dead German composers—Mozart, Beethoven, Haydn… Today we have new versions of those composers. New methods, new philosophies, new ways to create—not only with music, but just making in general. I would like to consider myself a hybrid, a new form of those composers. Fusion. Collaboration. That’s what I learned while I was here at the music school. Making music with other people, creating something new, or rethinking ways of creating something that already existed. And that’s what I represent as an artist. Fusion.”